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September 19, 2019

Faculty Position in Neuroscience

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

INSTITUTE OF NEUROSCIENCE

 Tenure-Track Position in

Computational Neuroscience

 

 

The Institute of Neuroscience (ion.uoregon.edu) and the Departments of Biology and Mathematics, in collaboration with the Data Sciences Initiative, at the University of Oregon announce a new tenure-track Assistant Professor position to study principles of neural circuit operation through the application of computational neuroscience methods.  The Institute of Neuroscience has a highly interactive community of investigators, including investigators in the new Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact (accelerate.uoregon.edu), examining the development and function of neural networks and their operation in behavior using state of the art in vivo methodologies.  The successful candidate will integrate with existing faculty to foster collaborative research towards understanding the operation of neural networks, from sensation, to planning, to execution.

Minimum qualifications are a Ph.D. in an appropriate field, commitment to excellent teaching at the undergraduate and graduate level, and an outstanding research record.  Candidates should have the ability to work effectively within a diverse community.  Interested persons should apply online through AcademicJobsOnline to the University of Oregon ION SEARCH at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14396.  Candidates should submit a cover letter (including a statement on how you will further UO’s goals of supporting, promoting and enhancing a diverse learning and working environment), a curriculum vitae including a publication list, a statement of research accomplishments and future research plans, a description of teaching experience and philosophy, and three letters of recommendation (sent independently). Submission of 1-3 selected reprints is encouraged.  UO is dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse and pluralistic faculty committed to teaching and working in a multicultural environment and strongly encourages applications from minorities, women, and people with disabilities.  Applicants should include information about how they will further this goal in their cover letter.  To be assured of consideration, application materials should be uploaded by November 1, 2019, but the position will remain open until filled.  Requests for more information can be sent to Dr. David McCormick, Director, Institute of Neuroscience (davidmc@uoregon.edu).

 

The University of Oregon is proud to offer a robust benefits package to eligible employees, including health insurance, retirement plans and paid time off. For more information about benefits, visit http://hr.uoregon.edu/careers/about-benefits.

The University of Oregon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution committed to cultural diversity and compliance with the ADA. The University encourages all qualified individuals to apply, and does not discriminate on the basis of any protected status, including veteran and disability status. The University is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to applicants and employees with disabilities. To request an accommodation in connection with the application process, please contact us at uocareers@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5112.
UO prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression in all programs, activities and employment practices as required by Title IX, other applicable laws, and policies. Retaliation is prohibited by UO policy. Questions may be referred to the Title IX Coordinator, Office of Civil Rights Compliance, or to the Office for Civil Rights. Contact information, related policies, and complaint procedures are listed on the statement of non-discrimination.
In compliance with federal law, the University of Oregon prepares an annual report on campus security and fire safety programs and services. The Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report is available online at http://police.uoregon.edu/annual-report.
September 6, 2019

Tenure Track Faculty Position in Human Microbiome Science

 

Tenure Track Faculty Position in Human Microbiome Science

Department of Biology

University of Oregon

 

 

The University of Oregon Department of Biology invites applications for a tenure-related position (Assistant Professor) in Human Microbiome Science. We are particularly interested in candidates whose research focuses on innovative computational, molecular, and/or microbiological approaches to address fundamental questions regarding the assembly, dynamics and function of the human microbiome. Candidates who have an interest in collaborating with both basic scientists and clinicians to explore the impact of the microbiome on human health and development are especially encouraged to apply.

 

The University of Oregon (UO) provides an outstanding interdisciplinary and interactive collegial environment for researchers interested in microbiome research. UO has designated Microbiome Science as one of four Presidential Science Initiatives (provost.uoregon.edu/presidential-science-initiative), recognized as priorities for growth and institutional investment.  The UO is a founding member of the Northwest Microbiome Network (www.ohsu.edu/octri/northwest-microbiome-network), a consortium of regional research universities that promotes collaboration among microbiome researchers.   The recently established Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact (accelerate.uoregon.edu) provides unique opportunities for rapidly translating microbiome discoveries into innovations.   UO hosts a number of research institutes and centers that support microbiome science, including the NIH-supported Microbial Ecology and Theory of Animals (META) Center for Host-Microbe Systems Biology, which brings together over a dozen faculty from multiple departments to pursue common interests regarding vertebrate microbiomes (meta.uoregon.edu).  UO maintains a number of core research facilities that support microbiome research, including the UO Genomics and Cell Characterization Core Facility (gc3f.uoregon.edu) and the UO High Performance Computing Facility  (hpc.uoregon.edu), as well as core facilities devoted to live imaging, gnotobiology and bioinformatics.  UO has a long history of innovative human subjects research, with ongoing opportunities for clinical collaboration with faculty from a number of disciplines, including Prevention Science, Human Physiology and Performance, Psychology and Anthropology.

 

Successful applicants will be expected to develop an outstanding research program and have a strong commitment to excellence in teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. A Ph.D. is required. Candidates who promote and enhance diversity are strongly desired. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal.

 

Interested persons should apply online to the University of Oregon MICRO SEARCH at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14240.  Applicants should submit a cover letter, a curriculum vitae including a publications list, a statement of research accomplishments and future research plans, a description of teaching experience and philosophy, and three letters of recommendation (sent independently). Submission of up to 3 selected reprints is encouraged.  For full posting and application directions, see http://careers.uoregon.edu/cw/en-us/listing/.  To be assured of consideration, application materials should be uploaded by October 1, 2019, but the search will remain open until the position is filled.

 

The University of Oregon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution committed to cultural diversity and compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.  The University encourages all qualified individuals to apply, and does not discriminate on the basis of any protected status, including veteran and disability status.

 

 

October 17, 2018

Institute research to look at climate stresses

Prairies from California to Washington state are catching the heat not just from wildfires but also from warming temperatures. For ranchers, it all means stress on pastureland. Full Story

January 10, 2018

Research from the Bradshaw – Holzapfel lab featured in AroundtheO

UO biologists seek to take bite out of mosquitoes

It’s only a first step, but a project led by two UO scientists eventually could deliver welcome news to outdoor lovers and the medical community.

Full article

October 12, 2017

Position Announcement Data Science Initiative: Assistant Professor Genomics and Bioinformatics

As part of a recently announced Presidential Initiative in Data Science, the University of Oregon seeks two tenure track faculty at the assistant professor level in computational and/or mathematical biology focusing within the areas of computational genomics, bioinformatics, and statistical genetics. We seek candidates developing quantitative approaches to address fundamental questions in genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, development, microbiology, neuroscience, evolution, ecology and/or human health. As part of the broader presidential initiative, the university is building a cross-disciplinary curricular and research program for data science writ large (see https://provost.uoregon.edu/data-science). This program is supported by the supercomputing cluster in the university’s recently launched High Performance Computing Research Core Facility. There is also the potential to interface directly with the recently announced $1 billion Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact.

We seek candidates developing and implementing novel computational and/or statistical approaches for the analysis of complex, large-scale genetic and genomic datasets, including those who use these data in conjunction with other sources of data (e.g., geospatial, developmental, metagenomic).

UO is dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse and pluralistic faculty committed to teaching and working in a multicultural environment and strongly encourages applications from minorities, women, and people with disabilities. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal.

See full announcement on UO Careers Page here: http://careers.uoregon.edu/cw/en-us/job/521093/assistant-professor-of-biologycismath

August 23, 2017

Position announcement: Assistant Professor in Human Microbiome Science.

The University of Oregon Department of Biology invites applications for a tenure-related position (Assistant Professor) in Human Microbiome Science.  The job ad appears on the UO Careers website: http://careers.uoregon.edu/cw/en-us/job/520628/assistant-professor-of-biology.

April 24, 2017

IE2 professor Peter Ralph quoted in Healthline article

IE2 professor Peter Ralph discusses the health consequences of genetically similar populations in Healthline article, “Are You Related to the Person You Married?”: http://www.healthline.com/health-news/are-you-related-to-the-person-you-married.

February 27, 2017

Roy lab called upon technology to solve an evolutionary riddle

Featured in the winter Cascade here :

http://cascade.uoregon.edu/winter2017/features/the-great-pretender/

January 12, 2017

MOCHA Study shows Climate Regulation of Harmful Algal Blooms

The NOAA-funded MOCHA (Monitoring Oregon’s Coastal Harmful Algae) team, that includes IE2 member Michelle Wood as a co-PI, has found that high levels of the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA) in shellfish on the U.S. west coast are linked to warm conditions of  major climate cycles like the El Niño Southern Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a twenty year time series of data on DA in shellfish was used to support the conclusion and validate a risk assessment model that can be used to determine likelihood of blooms of DA producing phytoplankton.  Read more in this article from “Around the O”.

August 8, 2016

Working group explores predictive models for microbiomes

Jessica Green and Ashkaan Fahimipour organized a 3-day working group at the Santa Fe Institute on the topic of modeling microbiomes. Former IE2 postdocs James O’Dwyer and Steve Kembel  were among the participants.. Some press from the group: http://www.santafe.edu/news/item/happening-now-sfi-working-group-explores-predictive-models-microbiomes/

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